4 hours ago   •   59 notes   •   VIA fawnvelveteen   •   SOURCE fawnvelveteen
fawnvelveteen:

Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte, 1900

fawnvelveteen:

Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte, 1900

5 hours ago   •   3 notes   •   VIA ifyoulooktherightway   •   SOURCE ifyoulooktherightway
1 day ago   •   3 notes   •   VIA jamesnathanillustration   •   SOURCE jamesnathanillustration
jamesnathanillustration:

TITAN BORN
Bit of fun before bed. A hypothetical book cover for fun. I think I may do a few of these. Coming up with the title was fun, I nearly called it TITAN DOWN but that reminded me too much of White House Down, so I changed it to TITAN BORN.

jamesnathanillustration:

TITAN BORN

Bit of fun before bed. A hypothetical book cover for fun. I think I may do a few of these. Coming up with the title was fun, I nearly called it TITAN DOWN but that reminded me too much of White House Down, so I changed it to TITAN BORN.

1 day ago   •   217 notes   •   VIA notwiselybuttoowell   •   SOURCE ornithomantist

L[ord] B[yron] re-peated some verses of Coleridge’s Christabel, of the witch’s breast; when silence ensued, and Shelley, suddenly shrieking and putting his hands to his head, ran out of the room with a candle. Threw water in his face, and after gave him ether. He was looking at Mrs. S[helley], and suddenly thought of a woman he had heard of who had eyes instead of nipples, which, taking hold of his mind, horrified him.

 - The Diary of John William Polidori 
2 days ago   •   2 notes
2 days ago   •   3,041 notes   •   VIA eric-the-half-a-bee   •   SOURCE ornithomantist

johnpolidori:

Accidentally writing “pervy shelley” instead of percy shelley

image

3 days ago   •   4 notes   •   VIA laura-silvae   •   SOURCE laura-silvae

laura-silvae:

Book Photo Challenge August: Day 29

Water book cover

This one is easy as you can see in the second photo, but spotlights for Socrates in Love (also known as Crying Out Love, In the Center of the World) by Kyoichi Katayama.

In the second photo, counterclockwise:

Robinson Crusoe & A Journal of the Plague Year - Daniel Defoe

Out of the Silent Planet - C. S. Lewis

Unfinished Tales - J. R. R. Tolkien

The Lightning Thief and The Son of Neptune - Rick Riordan 

Shipwrecks - Akira Yoshimura

In the Heart of the Sea - Nathaniel Philbrick

The Ocean at the End of the Lane - Neil Gaiman

3 days ago   •   61 notes   •   VIA danskjavlarna   •   SOURCE danskjavlarna
danskjavlarna:

The Haunted Manor House, 1896.

danskjavlarna:

The Haunted Manor House, 1896.

4 days ago   •   4 notes
"Anathem" by Neal Stephenson

Stephenson is an incredibly talented speculative fiction author. I hesitate to call his work science fiction: Although he deals heavily in technology and mathematics, he always manages to go beyond that. 
This is a novel that’s difficult to summarize: Anathem takes place in a world where the intellectual elite have entered monastic communities for the sake of pursuing a lifetime of study. Possessing very limited access to technology and living in complete separation from the secular world, the isolation of these “avouts” is what gives them the opportunity to develop highly complex mathematical and philosophical theories about the world. 
The novel follows one particular avout, Erasmus. The first few chapters read as a coming of age story - We’re treated a basic breakdown of his daily life, his relationships, his family (as it exists both within the monastic community and outside of it in the secular world), and his love interest. But just as the reader settles into a plotline where Erasmus is deciding upon his future career path, Stephenson changes genre on us: The story turns into a mystery, investigating the sudden excommunication of another character. The storyline then changes again, this time into an adventure story. Then science fiction. Then spy novel. Then political drama. Stephenson genre-hops over and over again, continuously making the reader question their assumptions about how the story will progress. 
Anathem is a unique mix of religion, anthropology, sociology and bildungsroman.  I once heard it described as a “space opera about math and aliens,” which is actually quite accurate. Any way that you frame it, this is a wholly engaging novel that I’ll need to reread at least twice more in order to fully appreciate. 
5/5 stars

"Anathem" by Neal Stephenson

Stephenson is an incredibly talented speculative fiction author. I hesitate to call his work science fiction: Although he deals heavily in technology and mathematics, he always manages to go beyond that.

This is a novel that’s difficult to summarize: Anathem takes place in a world where the intellectual elite have entered monastic communities for the sake of pursuing a lifetime of study. Possessing very limited access to technology and living in complete separation from the secular world, the isolation of these “avouts” is what gives them the opportunity to develop highly complex mathematical and philosophical theories about the world. 

The novel follows one particular avout, Erasmus. The first few chapters read as a coming of age story - We’re treated a basic breakdown of his daily life, his relationships, his family (as it exists both within the monastic community and outside of it in the secular world), and his love interest. But just as the reader settles into a plotline where Erasmus is deciding upon his future career path, Stephenson changes genre on us: The story turns into a mystery, investigating the sudden excommunication of another character. The storyline then changes again, this time into an adventure story. Then science fiction. Then spy novel. Then political drama. Stephenson genre-hops over and over again, continuously making the reader question their assumptions about how the story will progress. 

Anathem is a unique mix of religion, anthropology, sociology and bildungsroman.  I once heard it described as a “space opera about math and aliens,” which is actually quite accurate. Any way that you frame it, this is a wholly engaging novel that I’ll need to reread at least twice more in order to fully appreciate. 

5/5 stars

4 days ago   •   3 notes   •   VIA cranberrycreative   •   SOURCE cranberrycreative
4 days ago   •   9 notes   •   VIA scificovers   •   SOURCE scificovers
scificovers:

The Second If Reader of Science Fiction, Frederik Pohl, editor, 1970. Cover by Jack Gaughan.

scificovers:

The Second If Reader of Science Fiction, Frederik Pohl, editor, 1970. Cover by Jack Gaughan.

5 days ago   •   3 notes   •   VIA bookcoverdaily   •   SOURCE bookcoverdaily
bookcoverdaily:

The Strangeness of Beauty Lydia Minatoya

bookcoverdaily:

The Strangeness of Beauty Lydia Minatoya

6 days ago   •   16,098 notes   •   VIA bananapeppers   •   SOURCE youpromisedmebroadway

youpromisedmebroadway:

stand up for girls and women who don’t like to read. stand up for girls and women who can’t read. stand up for girls and women with low IQs. stand up for girls and women who can’t write. stand up for girls and women whose access to education has been prevented. for those with learning disorders. for those who mix up “your” and “you’re” because it’s not that big a fucking deal tumblr. stand up for women who are called ableist slurs for these things and stop implying that the only way to be a feminist icon is by being an intellectual.

6 days ago   •   4 notes   •   VIA arcadianmorning   •   SOURCE arcadianmorning
arcadianmorning:

Jason Booher’s cover re-design of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre.

arcadianmorning:

Jason Booher’s cover re-design of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre.