22 minutes ago   •   2 notes   •   VIA ofleafstructure   •   SOURCE ofleafstructure
ofleafstructure:

Cover by Jack Gaughan

ofleafstructure:

Cover by Jack Gaughan

1 hour ago   •   3 notes   •   VIA readingtolive   •   SOURCE readingtolive
readingtolive:

Maya Angelou - I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings

readingtolive:

Maya Angelou - I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings

71806 ASKED: You have great brows!

Thanks!

23 hours ago   •   41,145 notes   •   VIA notwiselybuttoowell   •   SOURCE historicaltimes
halfhardtorock:

lokisgift:

particularscarf:

bacon-radio:

historicaltimes:

Normandy landing that you didnt see. 1944

Red Cross workers.

That is seriously the most badass thing I’ve ever seen.

… i hate to feel like asking: this is for real right?

From the Red Cross page.

halfhardtorock:

lokisgift:

particularscarf:

bacon-radio:

historicaltimes:

Normandy landing that you didnt see. 1944

Red Cross workers.

That is seriously the most badass thing I’ve ever seen.

… i hate to feel like asking: this is for real right?

From the Red Cross page.

1 day ago   •   2 notes   •   VIA queenoe   •   SOURCE queenoe
queenoe:

And The Fox Crows – book cover

Freshly minted book cover for V.C. Linde’s new chapbook of poems, “And the Fox Crows,” soon to be published by Foxspirit Books. Image ©sljohnson2014

queenoe:

And The Fox Crows – book cover

Freshly minted book cover for V.C. Linde’s new chapbook of poems, “And the Fox Crows,” soon to be published by Foxspirit Books. Image ©sljohnson2014

1 day ago   •   14 notes   •   VIA peninsularian   •   SOURCE peninsularian
peninsularian:

Nabokov’s Dozen / Vladimir Nabokov (Penguin UK 1960)
Cover illustration by J. Faczynski

peninsularian:

Nabokov’s Dozen / Vladimir Nabokov (Penguin UK 1960)

Cover illustration by J. Faczynski

1 day ago   •   16 notes

In the 1890s, when Freud was at the dawn of his career, he was struck by how many of his female patients were revealing childhood incest victimization to him. Freud concluded that child sexual abuse was one of the major causes of emotional disturbances in adult women and wrote a brilliant and humane paper called “The Aetiology of Hysteria.” However, rather than receiving acclaim from his colleagues for his ground-breaking insights, Freud met with scorn. He was ridiculed for believing that men of excellent reputation (most of his patients came from upstanding homes) could be perpetrators of incest.

`

Within a few years, Freud buckled under the heavy pressure and recanted his conclusions. In their place he proposed the “Oedipus Complex,” which became the foundation of modern psychology. According to this theory any young girl actually desires sexual contact with her father, because she wants to compete with her mother to be the most special person in his life. Freud used this construct to conclude that the episodes of incestuous abuse his clients had revealed to him had never taken place; they were simply fantasies of events the women had wished for when they were children and that the women had come to believe were real. This construct started a hundred-year history in the mental health field of blaming victims for the abuse perpetrated on them and outright discredited of women’s and children’s reports of mistreatment by men.

 -

“Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men” by Lundy Bancroft

Just in case you forgot why Freud is trash.

2 days ago   •   19 notes   •   VIA davidesky2   •   SOURCE davidesky2

davidesky2:

Classic SF and fantasy cover art by James Warhola.

2 days ago   •   6 notes   •   VIA fortybubbl-es   •   SOURCE fortybubbl-es
fortybubbl-es:

Stories of Tanuki in Awa Province (Awa no Tanuki no Hanashi 阿波の狸の話), by Kasai Shin’ya 笠井新也. First published in 1927 (Chūkōbunko 中公文庫).

Tanuki !

fortybubbl-es:

Stories of Tanuki in Awa Province (Awa no Tanuki no Hanashi 阿波の狸の話), by Kasai Shin’ya 笠井新也. First published in 1927 (Chūkōbunko 中公文庫).

Tanuki !

2 days ago   •   2,038 notes   •   VIA notwiselybuttoowell   •   SOURCE gilbertblythe

gilbertblythe:

get to know me meme — [1 / 5] favourite female characters →  Anne Shirley

'People laugh at me because I use big words. But if you have big ideas, you have to use big words to express them, haven't you?'

3 days ago   •   3 notes

17 Insanely Clever Hacks For Teachers, By Teachers 

Genius

3 days ago   •   392 notes   •   VIA rhade-zapan   •   SOURCE rhade-zapan
3 days ago   •   2 notes
I got catcalled today while I was reading “Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men” by Lundy Bancroft.
Made me wish that I was reading a physical copy, rather than the Kindle edition, so that the book cover could have been a visible shield in front of my face. I can’t help but wonder how the situation would have played out if this guy was actually confronted with his behavior in that way. 

I got catcalled today while I was reading “Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men” by Lundy Bancroft.

Made me wish that I was reading a physical copy, rather than the Kindle edition, so that the book cover could have been a visible shield in front of my face. I can’t help but wonder how the situation would have played out if this guy was actually confronted with his behavior in that way. 

3 days ago   •   60 notes   •   VIA shihlun   •   SOURCE shihlun
shihlun:

犯罪公論 The Criminal Review (1931)

shihlun:

犯罪公論 The Criminal Review (1931)

4 days ago   •   1,941 notes   •   VIA official-mens-frights-activist   •   SOURCE historicity-was-already-taken

We need to talk about Anne Frank

historicity-was-already-taken:

As of this writing, John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars has sold over one million copies, and holds a place on several bestseller lists. The film adaptation of the book has made over two hundred million dollars in the domestic and foreign market. The book and the movie tell the story of two terminally ill American teenagers, and both contain a scene where the protagonists, Hazel and Augustus, share a kiss in the Anne Frank House. John Green made the following statement regarding the scene:

“Anne Frank was a pretty good example of a young person who ended up having the kind of heroic arc that Augustus wants—she was remembered and she left this mark that he thinks is valuable—but when he has to confront her death, he has to confront the reality that really she was robbed of the opportunity to live or die for something. She just died of illness like most people. And so I wanted him to go with a sort of expectation of her heroism and be sort of dashed.”

Here, Green makes it clear that he reads Anne Frank’s death as being from an illness like “most people,” like his protagonist. In doing so, he erases the circumstances under which she contracted typhus. “Most people” are not Ashkenazic Jewish teenage girls who contracted typhus in a concentration camp during the Holocaust. This fundamental erasure of the context of her death allowed him, those involved in the cinematic adaptation, and yes, a large portion of his readership, to accept the use of Anne Frank and her death as a prop in this American YA love story. Indeed, when further called on the issue, Green stated:

“I’ve been getting this question a lot. I can’t speak for the movie, obviously, as I didn’t make it, but as for the book: The Fault in Our Stars was the first non-documentary feature film to be granted access to the Anne Frank House precisely because the House’s board of directors and curators liked that scene in the novel a great deal. (A spokesperson recently said, ‘In the book it is a moving and sensitively handled scene.’) Abraham H. Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League and a Holocaust survivor, had this to say: ‘The kissing scene in ‘The Fault in Our Stars’ in the annex of the Anne Frank House is not offensive or against who Anne Frank was. What Anne communicated in her diary was hope. She celebrated life and she celebrated hope.’ Obviously, the Anne Frank House and the ADL do not have a monopoly on Anne’s life or her legacy, but their opinions are important to me.”

I take issue with this response. Here, Green is divesting himself of responsibility for the scene, and communicating to his critics that he is not to blame, because the Anne Frank House board of directors, curators, and a Holocaust survivor approved of it. In other words, he is drawing these peoples’ assumed authority to silence criticism, and to avoid taking responsibility for the filmed version of a scene he created.

The Anne Frank House, for all the wonderful work it does, is a museum. Like all museums, it must work to attract and reach out to potential patrons. In other words, museums have to advertise because they require patrons and revenues to exist. Therefore, I read the official approval of the Anne Frank House simply as a targeted attempt to reach out to and attract a pool of untapped, younger patrons. They chose to support the filming of a sympathetic romantic scene about terminally ill teenagers in their institution to reach out to young people. While that is a sound business decision, I would argue that it’s hardly an ethical one for the Anne Frank House, an institution devoted, as per their website, to:

“the preservation of the place where Anne Frank went into hiding during the Second World War, and to bringing the life story of Anne Frank to the attention of as many people as possible worldwide with the aim of raising awareness of the dangers of anti-Semitism, racism and discrimination and the importance of freedom, equal rights and democracy,”

to support the filming of this scene. For, in Green’s own words, that scene had nothing to do with the context of Anne Frank’s death, and therefore, it did nothing to bring Anne Frank’s story to life. And it hardly raises awareness of contemporary European anti-Semitism.

As for the ADL, I very much agree with Mr. Foxman’s assessment of Anne Frank. However, what she celebrated in her life and her writings have little to do with what she has come to mean in within public memory of the Holocaust of European Jewry. Her narrative has been used by nations and educational systems to the extent that for many, she is the Holocaust; she is the face of the Holocaust. But what we inherit from her isn’t the experience of the Holocaust. That experience, and her death at Bergen Belsen take place outside the pages of her diary. Readers are never forced to experience the Holocaust through her eyes; they are able to embrace the tragedy of the Holocaust through her story while remaining removed from its experiential realities. Thus, Anne Frank becomes the Holocaust without forcing anyone to experience it. Her name can be invoked to summon tragedy, without forcing anyone to feel it.

While Anne Frank may be the face of the Holocaust of European Jewry, the memory of the experiential reality of the Holocaust is male. The way we conceptualize and remember the concentration camp experience is constructed by male narratives. More Jewish men survived the Holocaust than Jewish women. Due to attitudes towards education in the interwar period, more male Jewish survivors had the education and literary capital needed to craft enduring narratives of their experiences than did female Jewish survivors. There are three foundational male Holocaust survival narratives: Night by Elie Wiesel, Survival in Auschwitz by Primo Levi, and Maus by Art Spiegelman about his father’s Holocaust experience. Never have I seen those three men and their narratives used as a joke, or a meme, or a cheap narrative device, or as self-promotion by an American pop star.

These men are revered, and their narratives taken extremely seriously. And none of them, none of them have been used in a prop in a story about terminally ill gentile American teenagers. They survived, in perhaps the type of heroic arc a John Green protagonist would yearn for. Yet Augustus doesn’t look to them. He doesn’t share a kiss with his girlfriend at Auschwitz. He shared a kiss with her in the Anne Frank House.

Anne Frank is not a prop. She is not a symbol, she is not a teenager who happened to die of an illness, and she is not one of the canonical Jewish male survivors. She is one of many millions of Jewish women and girls who were industrially murdered like livestock, incinerated, and left in an unmarked grave. That is the story of the Holocaust of European Jewry, and that is the story of the persecution and murder of all Europeans (the disabled, Romani, Irish Travelers, homosexuals, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Communists) who failed to fit into Nazi racial and ideological constructs.

And we would all do well to remember that.

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