27 minutes ago   •   104 notes   •   VIA keyframedaily   •   SOURCE keyframedaily

keyframedaily:

"You find yourself making special rules for stuff to keep. Sentimental reasons. Things that remind you why you try to be creative. Things that make you laugh. Or things that you are certain you have the very last copy in the universe of, and you are the greatest self-taught librarian ever.”

19 hours ago   •   760 notes   •   VIA bisexual-books   •   SOURCE bisexual-books

bisexual-books:

It’s time for another Bisexual Books giveaway!  Bisexual YA author Corinne Duyvis was generous enough to send us some swag from her US tour and we’re happy to pass it along to you guys!  

You could win all the fantastic goodies pictured above:

Now all the boring rules stuff:

  • This giveaway is open to everyone (yes international friends this includes you).  
  • You must be following us here at bisexual-books to win
  • You must reblog this post (likes don’t count for this one sorry guys).   
  • You can reblog as many times as you’d like
  • But no giveaway blogs  
  • Winners will be chosen August 10th at 8pm CST

And don’t forget to enter our other two awesome giveaways — one for bisexual comics and the other for romance!

22 hours ago   •   30,509 notes   •   VIA fit-state-of-mind   •   SOURCE killerville

WRITING TIP NO. 235577

killerville:

female characters should be like the heads of the dreaded hydra. if you take one away, seven more must come back in her place.

1 day ago   •   697 notes   •   VIA weloveperioddrama   •   SOURCE weloveperioddrama

"For the first time in his life, Grenouille realized that he had no smell of his own. He realized that all his life he had been a nobody to everyone. What he now felt was the fear of his own oblivion. It was a though he did not exist."
(requested by shallicomparetheetolagrenouille)

1 day ago   •   4 notes   •   VIA bookcoverdaily   •   SOURCE bookcoverdaily
bookcoverdaily:

Paradise Regained by John Milton

bookcoverdaily:

Paradise Regained by John Milton

1 day ago   •   139 notes   •   VIA retroreverbs   •   SOURCE retroreverbs
retroreverbs:

In the Shadow of the Cat by Wendy England (1980).

retroreverbs:

In the Shadow of the Cat by Wendy England (1980).

2 days ago   •   144,797 notes   •   VIA tastefullyoffensive   •   SOURCE tastefullyoffensive

tastefullyoffensive:

[aaragon]

2 days ago   •   2 notes   •   VIA portadaz   •   SOURCE portadaz
portadaz:

wonder story on Flickr.

portadaz:

wonder story on Flickr.

2 days ago   •   53,577 notes   •   VIA strudel-butt   •   SOURCE weirdbooksifind
nineprotons:

kittyboops:

kittyboops:

vaishino:

kittyboops:

notpulpcovers:

Canada, eh?
morebadbookcovers:

wordsofdiana:

corpsecaddy:

So I found this harlequin romance paperback today, and normally I just toss those right over without paying them much mind, but the cover of this one made me pause. Sure that the artist was just taking liberties, I checked out the back.

I’m dubious. I should read a passage:

It is a literal bear.
Okay yeah I’ll admit it I’m going to read this but only because it sounds like the most fucked up romance novel in existence.
But wait….

You have some explaining to do, Canada.

You guys don’t understand. Screw it being a bestseller, 50 Shades of Gray is a bestseller, this book won the Governor General’s Award. That’s the highest literary award in Canada. That’s the pulitzer prize of Canadian literature. Bear is a part of Canadian literary history.

HOLY MOLY.


The author is a really important part of Canadian history, she paved the road for many other female Canadian writers and helped with equality in the field a huge degree. She’s a really important person in our creative history and every time this post goes by joking about the one novel in her sprawling collection of works, a little twitch goes off. I know it’s funny but she was a pretty amazing person for what she opened up for the future of writing in our country, so it’s kind of depressing to see her turned into a joke.

I don’t think it necessarily makes her a joke. Like, this one book maybe, but that doesn’t diminish the rest. Like, we can snicker about James Joyce’s lewd as fuck love letters while acknowledging his literary achievements.
Plus, accomplishments aside, her other work notwithstanding, this is still a book about fucking a bear that won our highest literary award. I’m sure it’s good if it won, but the subject matter still makes your head tilt a little.

The book is not about “fucking a bear.” The book is about fear of female sexuality and is written primarily in a lyrical manner. It was a book which challenged male-dominated sexual morality in its time.

…additionally - I would likewise add that a lot of my annoyance stems from Tumblr’s faux-feminism. Everyone wants to be nuts about feminism on this site, but no one aside a handful of older people or well-educated ones in their 20s seem to understand the history of feminism. It’s become like this site’s little catch-phrase, and it’s really beginning to irritate me.
I see things like this being reblogged with no understanding of its cultural significance, the women in history involved in it, or how much it shaped our rights today. Tumblr feminists have this lazy, myopic view of the world, and it’s a very trendy version of it, as well.
So being on a website that proclaims itself to be full of “feminists” and seeing 40k+ notes on a novel written by a feminist, about female sexuality, which shaped the women who helped give us our rights professionally and in the home-life, being made fun of is just so hypocritical that it makes me angry. 
(My anger being directed to all of tumblr, not to any single individual, I might add.)
Women who wrote books like this are the women who gave our mothers and grandmothers hope, and instead of being celebrated in any other post they tend to be torn apart or turned into memes or jokes because sense of self in the time they were published isn’t hip and cool for 15 - 20 somethings who pretend to be feminists but have no idea what they are doing or saying.
It’s just very frustrating and very wearying for those of us who know through listening to older women who these people actually are and how they gave me the rights I have today to see them minimized into this.

I will say with your explanation I’m very curious about the novel now and wouldn’t mind checking it out, for the angle/writing style/etc you describe.

nineprotons:

kittyboops:

kittyboops:

vaishino:

kittyboops:

notpulpcovers:

Canada, eh?

morebadbookcovers:

wordsofdiana:

corpsecaddy:

So I found this harlequin romance paperback today, and normally I just toss those right over without paying them much mind, but the cover of this one made me pause. Sure that the artist was just taking liberties, I checked out the back.

image

I’m dubious. I should read a passage:

image

It is a literal bear.

Okay yeah I’ll admit it I’m going to read this but only because it sounds like the most fucked up romance novel in existence.

But wait….

image

You have some explaining to do, Canada.

You guys don’t understand. Screw it being a bestseller, 50 Shades of Gray is a bestseller, this book won the Governor General’s Award. That’s the highest literary award in Canada. That’s the pulitzer prize of Canadian literature. Bear is a part of Canadian literary history.

HOLY MOLY.

The author is a really important part of Canadian history, she paved the road for many other female Canadian writers and helped with equality in the field a huge degree. She’s a really important person in our creative history and every time this post goes by joking about the one novel in her sprawling collection of works, a little twitch goes off. I know it’s funny but she was a pretty amazing person for what she opened up for the future of writing in our country, so it’s kind of depressing to see her turned into a joke.

I don’t think it necessarily makes her a joke. Like, this one book maybe, but that doesn’t diminish the rest. Like, we can snicker about James Joyce’s lewd as fuck love letters while acknowledging his literary achievements.

Plus, accomplishments aside, her other work notwithstanding, this is still a book about fucking a bear that won our highest literary award. I’m sure it’s good if it won, but the subject matter still makes your head tilt a little.

The book is not about “fucking a bear.” The book is about fear of female sexuality and is written primarily in a lyrical manner. It was a book which challenged male-dominated sexual morality in its time.

…additionally - I would likewise add that a lot of my annoyance stems from Tumblr’s faux-feminism. Everyone wants to be nuts about feminism on this site, but no one aside a handful of older people or well-educated ones in their 20s seem to understand the history of feminism. It’s become like this site’s little catch-phrase, and it’s really beginning to irritate me.

I see things like this being reblogged with no understanding of its cultural significance, the women in history involved in it, or how much it shaped our rights today. Tumblr feminists have this lazy, myopic view of the world, and it’s a very trendy version of it, as well.

So being on a website that proclaims itself to be full of “feminists” and seeing 40k+ notes on a novel written by a feminist, about female sexuality, which shaped the women who helped give us our rights professionally and in the home-life, being made fun of is just so hypocritical that it makes me angry. 

(My anger being directed to all of tumblr, not to any single individual, I might add.)

Women who wrote books like this are the women who gave our mothers and grandmothers hope, and instead of being celebrated in any other post they tend to be torn apart or turned into memes or jokes because sense of self in the time they were published isn’t hip and cool for 15 - 20 somethings who pretend to be feminists but have no idea what they are doing or saying.

It’s just very frustrating and very wearying for those of us who know through listening to older women who these people actually are and how they gave me the rights I have today to see them minimized into this.

I will say with your explanation I’m very curious about the novel now and wouldn’t mind checking it out, for the angle/writing style/etc you describe.

3 days ago   •   2 notes   •   VIA discoveriesinthelibrary   •   SOURCE discoveriesinthelibrary

discoveriesinthelibrary:

A study of artists’ treatment of hell and heaven is accompanied by examinations of the Christian, Jewish, Buddhist, and Islamic beliefs in an afterlife” (Google Books)

3 days ago   •   10 notes   •   VIA squarecarousel   •   SOURCE squarecarousel

squarecarousel:

Challenge 49: Collector’s Edition: The Golden Compass

Hello all, I’m pleased to be filling the shoes of the wonderful Elizabeth Beals for this month’s challenge!
The last book I ‘read’, or rather listened to, was the audiobook of A Dance with Dragons, the 5th in the A Song of Ice and Fire series. Here’s my take on how the hardcover collector’s edition might look, with the symbols of various houses (and a certain city) ready to ‘dance’ in silver foil. 

-Sayada

3 days ago   •   14,820 notes   •   VIA senatorkhaleesi   •   SOURCE lalie
lianabrooks:

britegreenstar:

libraryadvocates:

lalie:

The fact that the ALA shared this link is so gloriously bitter and angry and I love it.

Is there a portmanteau for that? Angritter? Bangry? 

My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.

Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 
While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.
That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 

lianabrooks:

britegreenstar:

libraryadvocates:

lalie:

The fact that the ALA shared this link is so gloriously bitter and angry and I love it.

Is there a portmanteau for that? Angritter? Bangry? 

My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.

Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 

While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.

That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 

4 days ago   •   1 note   •   VIA frenchscificovers   •   SOURCE frenchscificovers
4 days ago   •   2 notes

allinatangle said: That seems dodgy as heck. Are charter schools usually okay in your corner of the globe?

Granted, there are some decent ones around, but I’m not familiar with this particular school. It could be awesome or it could be trash. It’s tough to tell without living in that area or knowing anyone on staff.

But my gut instinct is saying that, even if the school is a legitimately wonderful place to work, this job listing and/or email might be a scam. Just the fact that they talk about how the interview only takes 20 minutes? That’s not how you field candidates for a full time teaching position. They’re going about everything wrong and unprofessionally. 

We’ll see. Maybe I’ll try to contact the school itself to ask about this HR Coordinator, but I have the feeling that nothing will come of this.