18 hours ago   •   4,798 notes   •   VIA notwiselybuttoowell   •   SOURCE themagicfarawayttree
cherrycoloured-funk:

themagicfarawayttree:
Medieval - Rabbits beating up man

cherrycoloured-funk:

themagicfarawayttree:

Medieval - Rabbits beating up man

18 hours ago   •   743 notes

What was a policeman, if not a civilian with a uniform and a badge? But they tended to use the term [civilian] these days as a way of describing people who were not policemen. It was a dangerous habit: once policemen stopped being civilians, the only other thing they could be was soldiers.

 - "Snuff" by Terry Pratchett
19 hours ago   •   1 note   •   VIA diaphanousvintage   •   SOURCE diaphanousvintage
19 hours ago   •   2,437 notes   •   VIA notwiselybuttoowell   •   SOURCE arsvitaest
arsvitaest:

Charles Baudelaire, Les fleurs du mal, Paris: Michel Lévy frères, 1868–69Painted cuir-ciselé panel inset on upper cover based on frontispiece by Félicien Rops for Les épaves

arsvitaest:

Charles Baudelaire, Les fleurs du mal, Paris: Michel Lévy frères, 186869
Painted cuir-ciselé panel inset on upper cover based on frontispiece by Félicien Rops for Les épaves

1 day ago   •   5 notes

He wanted there to be conspirators. It was much better to imagine men in some smoky room somewhere, made mad and cynical by privilege and power, plotting over the brandy. You had to cling to this sort of image, because if you didn’t then you might have to face the fact that bad things happened because ordinary people, the kind who brushed the dog and told their children bedtime stories, were capable of then going out and doing horrible things to other ordinary people. It was so much easier to blame it on Them. It was bleakly depressing to think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyone’s fault. If it was Us, what did that make Me? After all, I’m one of Us. I must be. I’ve certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No one ever thinks of themselves as one of Them. We’re always one of Us. It’s Them that do the bad things.

 - "Jingo" by Terry Pratchett
1 day ago   •   3 notes

It’s truly amazing how many people leave their canes at my cash register.

Like I know that I’m a goddess, but my healing powers aren’t that strong yet. I’m pretty sure they still need those canes to walk.

1 day ago   •   115 notes   •   VIA book-coverage   •   SOURCE arsvitaest
book-coverage:

filipijnsebelofte:

sugarmeows:

“Anatomy for Interior Designers”, 1948, front of book cover, designed by Alvin Lustig.

(via arsvitaest)

book-coverage:

filipijnsebelofte:

sugarmeows:

“Anatomy for Interior Designers”, 1948, front of book cover, designed by Alvin Lustig.

(via arsvitaest)

1 day ago   •   3 notes   •   VIA jamespauljones   •   SOURCE jamespauljones
jamespauljones:

The House Of The Spirits - Isabel Allende

jamespauljones:

The House Of The Spirits - Isabel Allende

1 day ago   •   15 notes   •   VIA agatheringofletters   •   SOURCE agatheringofletters
2 days ago   •   145 notes   •   VIA breathingbooks   •   SOURCE nationalbook

nationalbook:

"Bookplates first appeared in the 1480s with the book–owner’s coat of arms. In America, people started using them as early as 1680 and in greater numbers in the 1730s. And by the end of the nineteenth century, when the Arts and Crafts Movement was challenging the excessive decoration of the earlier Victorian taste, bookplate collecting became a fashionable pursuit, one that would remain so until World War II."

Via the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art Blog, the graphic contributions of American artists to the history of the bookplate.

2 days ago   •   7,188 notes   •   VIA steelfemme   •   SOURCE officialjeffgoldblum

foucault-the-haters:

officialjeffgoldblum:

first rule of fight club: be a misogynistic tool

second rule of fight club: pretend exaltation of masculinity is profound in a masculine society

2 days ago   •   2 notes   •   VIA frenchscificovers   •   SOURCE frenchscificovers

The moon, like a gardenia in the night’s button-hole—but no! why should a writer never be able to mention the moon without likening her to something else—usually something to which she bears not the faintest resemblance?… The moon, looking like nothing whatsoever but herself, was engaged in her old and futile endeavour to mark the hours correctly on the sun-dial at the centre of the lawn.

 - "Zuleika Dobson, or, an Oxford love story" by Sir Max Beerbohm
3 days ago   •   2 notes   •   VIA pelz   •   SOURCE pelz
pelz:

journey to infinity on Flickr.

pelz:

journey to infinity on Flickr.

3 days ago   •   1,460 notes   •   VIA heyteenbookshey   •   SOURCE catagator
catagator:

Reviewing is an ART that takes a lot of time and practice. This is 101. 

catagator:

Reviewing is an ART that takes a lot of time and practice. This is 101.